Adult orthodontics can be complex and often involves input from other dentists and specialists as well. Why is combined care sometimes necessary?

Adult treatment can be more complex than adolescent treatment due to a variety of factors. In certain situations, different dental professionals will work together as a team to deliver you comprehensive care.

For example, treatment can only be carried out when there is an absence of dental disease. Input from your general dentist or a hygienist may be necessary to get you ‘dentally fit’ before starting orthodontic treatment.

Sometimes orthodontists will move teeth to make space for fillings or replacement teeth. You will then usually see another member of the dental team to do the restorative work. Also, in non-growing adults, treatment results are not always possible without surgical intervention.

Who could be involved in my orthodontic treatment plan?

To get you an ideal outcome as an adult, orthodontists will often work with other dental professionals including your general dentist, hygienists or other specialists such as:

Corrective Jaw Surgery (Orthognathic Surgery)

When a person has a significant mismatch in the size of their jaws, often their bite cannot be corrected with orthodontics alone. In these situations, an orthodontist will work with an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon.

Jaw surgery is more common in adult patients as they do not have growth to help achieve orthodontic results.

The orthodontist will start by lining up teeth in preparation for the corrective jaw surgery. While the braces are still on, the surgeon will then operate to reposition the jaw(s) causing the problem. After healing, the orthodontist continues treatment and moves the teeth into their final positions.

Space optimisation for missing teeth

Orthodontics may be needed to make space for prosthetic replacement of missing or extracted teeth. Treatment for this usually requires a team approach. The orthodontist will liaise with a restorative dentist or prosthodontic specialist to decide which spaces are to be optimised. They will also commonly work in with a Maxillofacial Surgeon or specialist periodontist if an implant is the desired replacement tooth option.

  • Why is combined care sometimes necessary?
  • Who could be involved in my orthodontic treatment plan?
  • Corrective Jaw Surgery (Orthognathic Surgery)
  • Space optimisation for missing teeth

Why is combined care sometimes necessary?

Adult treatment can be more complex than adolescent treatment due to a variety of factors. In certain situations, different dental professionals will work together as a team to deliver you comprehensive care.



For example, treatment can only be carried out when there is an absence of dental disease. Input from your general dentist or a hygienist may be necessary to get you ‘dentally fit’ before starting orthodontic treatment.



Sometimes orthodontists will move teeth to make space for fillings or replacement teeth. You will then usually see another member of the dental team to do the restorative work. Also, in non-growing adults, treatment results are not always possible without surgical intervention.


Who could be involved in my orthodontic treatment plan?

To get you an ideal outcome as an adult, orthodontists will often work with other dental professionals including your general dentist, hygienists or other specialists such as:




  • Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

  • Prosthodontists

  • Periodontists

  • Endodontists


Corrective Jaw Surgery (Orthognathic Surgery)

When a person has a significant mismatch in the size of their jaws, often their bite cannot be corrected with orthodontics alone. In these situations, an orthodontist will work with an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon.



Jaw surgery is more common in adult patients as they do not have growth to help achieve orthodontic results.



The orthodontist will start by lining up teeth in preparation for the corrective jaw surgery. While the braces are still on, the surgeon will then operate to reposition the jaw(s) causing the problem. After healing, the orthodontist continues treatment and moves the teeth into their final positions.


Space optimisation for missing teeth

Orthodontics may be needed to make space for prosthetic replacement of missing or extracted teeth. Treatment for this usually requires a team approach. The orthodontist will liaise with a restorative dentist or prosthodontic specialist to decide which spaces are to be optimised. They will also commonly work in with a Maxillofacial Surgeon or specialist periodontist if an implant is the desired replacement tooth option.